1. ayueza:

    *REBLOGS FICTIONAL CHARACTERS BEING GAY TOGETHER WHILE IN THE SAME ROOM AS PARENTS*

    (via princegaylord)

     
  2.  
  3. image

    (Source: jenna-maroney, via casfucker)

     

    1. baby: d-d-d-d
    2. dad: daddy?
    3. baby: destroy capitalism
    4. karl marx: nice
     
  4. theofficequotescalendar:

    "White collar and blue collar."

    I’ll be posting daily whatever the calendar has to say! Along with other memorable office quotes & moments.

    So if you love The Office be sure to hit reblog & click the link to follow!
    http://theofficequotescalendar.tumblr.com

    Follow us on twitter!
    http://twitter.com/officequotescal

     

  5. idetesteverything:

    idetesteverything:

    hermitical-inequality-pacifist:

    Read it and weep, snowflakes.

    Oh my god, this is perfect.

    For the dearies who didn’t want to, or didn’t have time to research, here’s a brief summary:

    —-Negative Stereotypes—-

    From a Q&A with one of the researchers, we learnt that activists (like feminists) “were perceived as militant, aggressive, forceful, argumentative and abrasive.”

    By aggressively promoting change and advocating unconventional practices, activists become associated with hostile militancy and unconventionality or eccentricity.

    In one study, 17 male and 45 female undergraduate students were randomly assigned to read a profile about a student who was a “typical” feminist (described as conforming to the stereotypes), an “atypical” feminist (described as not conforming to the stereotypes) or someone whose commitment to feminism was not described. All participants then rated the extent to which the stereotypical traits belonged to character they read about, as well as if they were interested in being associated with the character.

    The most common traits for “typical feminists” included “man-hating”, “eccentric”, “militant” and “unhygienic”.

    —-Aversion to Association—-

    Another study, featuring 17 male and 45 female undergraduates, confirmed the pervasiveness of those stereotypes. It further found participants were less interested in befriending activists who participated in stereotypical behavior (such as staging protest rallies), but could easily envision hanging out with those who use “nonabrasive and mainstream methods” such as raising money or organizing social events.

    “We found that participants were less motivated to adopt pro-gender equality behaviours when the article was ostensibly delivered by the ‘typical’ feminist rather than by one of the other message sources,” says Bashir.

    The results of three additional studies suggested this aversion to perceived stereotypical behavior impacts people’s behavior. They don’t want other people to view them in the same negative view and consequently be attributed with commonly perceived negative stereotypes.

    Due to these negative stereotypes, people are reluctant to adopt the behaviours that these movements (like feminism) promote.

    “Furthermore, this tendency to associate activists with negative stereotypes and perceive them as people with whom it would be unpleasant to affiliate reduces individuals’ motivation to adopt the pro-change behaviors that activists advocate.”

    In contrast, the studies also showed that people are more receptive of the message when it comes from an individual who does not conform to these negative stereotypes.

    What does this mean? Are all activists this way?

    “It’s important to keep in mind that this research is focused on how activists are perceived by others, rather than how they actually are,” Bashir says. “The militant and eccentric characteristics do not necessarily describe the actual personality traits possessed by activists.”

    In conclusion, negative stereotypes are limiting the influence of what are supposed to be progressive and benign social movements.

    So how do we deal with the problem of negative stereotypes?

    The researchers suggest that the general public “may be more receptive to advocates who defy stereotypes by coming across as pleasant and approachable.”

    But there is some value to activists in considering that people do perceive them negatively and maybe they do need to tweak their strategy a bit to take into consideration the way they’re coming across to people.

    —-Additional Comments—-

    This is a feminist’s response to the research, in which she actively encourages the reader to completely disregard the stereotypes, ignoring the harm the stereotypes are inflicting to their own cause, and the advice given by the researchers (to be more considerate). Feminists should simply ‘fight back’ instead (thereby inadvertently reinforcing those negative stereotypes). Her reasoning being that it’s the privileged people who are censoring activists and smearing the name of feminism.

    The solution to that, Mr. Jacobs, isn’t to turn around and waggle fingers at the feminists for being insufficiently smiley (and in doing so to reinforce the false assumption that feminists are… what was the word? “Overwhelmingly negative”?). The solution is to instead push back against the people trying to use their privilege to control the conversation; to push back against the many, many people who use their political, media, and social power to smear the name of feminism in order to intimidate people from claiming that term for themselves.

    Not only is she promoting actions that would consequently reinforce the stereotypes she’s offended about, but she is blatantly refusing to acknowledge the militant feminists that exist in great numbers in her movement, and are considerably the most vocal group.

    So I implore you, dear keyboard warrior feminists, to realize that saying this

    and doing this

    is not helping your cause at all.

    All you’re doing is proving the negative stereotypes to be true.

    Don’t blame The Patriarchy™ if ever your movement ends up in flames incited by your own reckless actions.

    Sources:

    http://www.salon.com/2013/09/26/study_everyone_hates_environmentalists_and_feminists_partner/

    http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/09/27/they-were-even-seen-as-terrorists-why-people-seem-to-hate-activists-but-not-what-they-stand-for/

    http://www.psmag.com/blogs/news-blog/feminism-maybe-feminists-ewww-66918/

    http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/main/newsitems/negative-stereotypes-activists-research

    And special thanks to anti-feminism-pro-equality, from whom I stole a couple of screenshots. (Sorry! <3)

    (via teamfreekickass)

     
  6.  

  7. officialunitedstates:

    Imagine a nice brown and green stegosaurus giving you a ride to school.  When school’s over he’d give you a necklace he made out of soda cans and pipe cleaners and then you’d go back to your house and play volleyball.

    (via officialunitedstates)

     
  8.  
  9.  
  10. (Source: dimme-d, via obamascleavage)

     
  11.  
  12. (Source: martag02, via obamascleavage)

     

  13. "The human family - originating in one small locale in East Africa a few million years ago - wandered, separated, diversified, and became strangers to one another…"
    — Carl Sagan, Billions and Billions (via whats-out-there)

    (via scinerds)

     

  14. duckktective:

    jeez i would love to order that thing online, but i don’t know what size to order it in because women’s clothing sizes are determined by the alignments of the planets in relation to the fuck you galaxy 

    (Source: dramaticleaves, via thussaithcastiel)